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1993 Nigerian coup d'état

1993 Nigerian coup d'état
Location Nigeria AU Africa.svg
DateNovember 17, 1993
Location
Result

Coup succeeds.

Belligerents
Nigeria Interim government Armed Forces
Commanders and leaders
Ernest Shonekan Sani Abacha

The 1993 Nigerian coup d'état was a bloodless military coup which took place in Nigeria on 17 November 1993[1] when the Armed Forces, headed by Defence Minister General Sani Abacha, forced Interim President Chief Ernest Shonekan to resign.[2] Shonekan assumed the interim presidency on 26 August 1993, succeeding General Ibrahim Babangida as head of state, in the aftermath of Babangida's annulment of the 12 June 1993 presidential election.[3][4] In a nationwide broadcast following the coup, Abacha cited the stagnant nature of Shonekan's government, and him being unable to manage the democratic process in the country as a cause of his resignation. In September 1994, Abacha issued a decree that placed his government above the jurisdiction of the courts, effectively giving him absolute power. Another decree gave him the right to detain anyone for up to three months.[5]

Abacha stayed in power until his death on 8 June 1998 at the presidential complex (Aso Villa) in Abuja.[6][7] He was succeeded by the Chief of the Defence Staff Major General Abdulsalami Abubakar as head of state.

References

  1. ^ "Nigerian Military Leader Ousts Interim President". The New York Times. 18 November 1993. Retrieved 11 July 2019.
  2. ^ Ojo, Bamidele A. (1998-01-01). Nigeria's Third Republic: The Problems and Prospects of Political Transition to Civil Rule. Nova Publishers. ISBN 9781560725800.
  3. ^ Campbell, Ian (1994). Nigeria's Failed Transition: The 1993 Presidential Election. Journal of Contemporary African Studies. pp. 179–199.
  4. ^ Kenneth B. Noble (June 24, 1993). "Nigerian Military Rulers Annul Election". New York Times.
  5. ^ "Nigerian Military Ruler Assumes Absolute Power". AP. 7 September 1994 – via The New York Times.
  6. ^ "BBC News – Nigeria – Abacha dies at 54". bbc.co.uk.
  7. ^ "General Sani Abacha Profile". Africa Confidential. Retrieved 19 June 2012.

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