wanweipedia

Buluggin ibn Ziri Redirected from Bologhine ibn Ziri

Buluggin ibn Ziri
Emir of Maghreb
Bologhine Benziri Benmenad.jpg
A statue of Buluggin ibn Ziri on the heights of the Casbah of Algiers
Reign972 – 984
SuccessorAl-Mansur ibn Buluggin
Died984 in Sijilmasa[1]
Names
Abu'l-Futuh Sayf al-Dawla Buluggin ibn Ziri ibn Manad al-Sanhaji
DynastyZirids
FatherZiri ibn Manad

Buluggin ibn Ziri, often transliterated Bologhine, in full Abu'l-Futuh Sayf al-Dawla Buluggin ibn Ziri ibn Manad al-Sanhaji (Arabic: أبو الفتوح سيف الدولة بلكين بن زيري بن مناد الصنهاجي‎; died 984) was the first ruler of the Sanhaja Berber dynasty of Zirids in Ifriqiya (972–984).

Bologhine, a suburb in the city of Algiers, is named after him.

Biography

While his father Ziri ibn Menad was emir of the central Maghreb, Buluggin ibn Ziri founded the city of Algiers on the site of the ancient Roman Icosium in 960, but also Médéa and Miliana. He also rebuilt the villages destroyed by the various revolts.[2]

On the death of his father, in a battle against Kharidjite Berber tribes in 971, the Fatimid Caliph Al-Mu'izz li-Din Allah appointed Buluggin ibn Ziri as Emir of the Maghreb. In addition to the attributions of his father Menad Abu Ziri, he received the regions of Zab and M'Sila that the defector Dja`far ibn `Ali ruled.[3] The honours bestowed on him would provoke the jealousy of the Kutamas.[4] Al-Mu'izz li-Din Allah left the governance of Sicily and Tripoli to members of his family.[5]

Buluggin continued the fight against the Zenatas. The Maghrawa asked for the help of the Umayyads of Cordoba to take back their territory and their cities. Buluggin then took control of almost all of the Maghreb under orders of the Fatimid Caliph.[4] to kill all the Zenatas and to collect taxes from the Berbers under threat of force. Buluggin molested the Maghrawa, the Hawwaras (branch of the Branis), the Nefzawas (branch of the Zenatas) and the Mazata. The prisoners were resettled in great numbers in the settlement of Ashir.[4]

The Fatimids transferred their court from Mahdia to Cairo. Buluggin was then appointed viceroy of Ifriqiya with Kairouan as its capital.[6][verification needed] The Fatimids had taken the treasury and fleet with them to Egypt, so the first priority of the Zirid government was to consolidate its rule. However the loss of the fleet meant loss of control over the Kalbids in Sicily. Buluggin took Fez, Sijilmasa and most of Morocco to the Atlantic coast.[7] During a campaign in Morocco, he fought against the Bargawata. The Caliphate of Córdoba was, however, able to retain the fortresses of Ceuta and Tangiers. Nevertheless, Buluggin remained a vassal of the Fatimids, to whom he had to pay tribute, and he remained surrounded by advisors who were there to support him as much as to watch over him. The Fatimids took with them wealth and military equipment. The absolute priority of the Zirids was therefore to strengthen their power, but the displacement of the Fatimid fleet towards Egypt made the conservation of the Kalbide territories in Sicily impossible.

Bologhine Ziri received from the Caliph the titles of Abu al-Futuh, "Father of Victories" and Sayf ad-Dawla "Sword of Empire".[5][8] In 977, Abu Mansur Nizar al-Aziz Billah, successor of Al-Muizz li-Dîn Allah, attributed to Bologhine the cities of Tripoli, Ajdabiya and Sirte in addition to his previous attributions.[5] He conquers Fez, Sijilmassa and but stopped before Ceuta. When he saw the square, which he considered impregnable, and the reinforcements of the Zenatas coming from Andalusia by sea, he turned back.[8] He punished the sovereign of the Barghawata, who was declared prophet, in an expedition in 980 or 981 in which he brought back a large number of Moroccan slaves; while his lieutenant paraded them in the streets the people of Ifriqiya were shocked as they had never seen such a large number of slaves before.[9]

In May 984, Bologhine died, and his son Al-Mansur succeeded him in all his attributions.

References

  1. ^ Emmanuel Kwaku Akyeampong; Henry Louis Gates (2 February 2012). Dictionary of African Biography. OUP USA. p. 9. ISBN 978-0-19-538207-5.
  2. ^ Khaldūn, Ibn (1854). Histoire des Berbères et des dynasties musulmanes de l'Afrique Septentrionale (in French). Impr. du Gouvernement.
  3. ^ Lévi-Provençal, Evariste (1999). Histoire de l'Espagne musulmane (in French). Maisonneuve et Larose. ISBN 978-2-7068-1387-0.
  4. ^ a b c Khaldūn, Ibn (1854). Histoire des Berbères et des dynasties musulmanes de l'Afrique Septentrionale (in French). Impr. du Gouvernement.
  5. ^ a b c Khaldūn, Ibn (1854). Histoire des Berbères et des dynasties musulmanes de l'Afrique Septentrionale (in French). Impr. du Gouvernement.
  6. ^ Julien, Charles André, 1891- (1994). Histoire de l'Afrique du Nord : des origines à 1830. Paris: Payot. p. 404. ISBN 2-228-88789-7. OCLC 32160417.CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  7. ^ Trudy Ring; Noelle Watson; Paul Schellinger (5 March 2014). Middle East and Africa: International Dictionary of Historic Places. Routledge. p. 36. ISBN 978-1-134-25986-1.
  8. ^ a b Khaldūn, Ibn (1854). Histoire des Berbères et des dynasties musulmanes de l'Afrique Septentrionale (in French). Impr. du Gouvernement.
  9. ^ Hady Roger, Idris (1962). La berbérie oriental sous les Zirides (PDF). Adrien-Maisonneuve. pp. 57 58.

This page was last updated at 2021-03-27 18:52, update this pageView original page

All information on this site, including but not limited to text, pictures, etc., are reproduced on Wikipedia (wikipedia.org), following the . Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License


Top

If the math, chemistry, physics and other formulas on this page are not displayed correctly, please useFirefox or Safari