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Dyle (department)

Department of Dyle

Département de la Dyle (fr)
Departement Dijle (nl)
1795–1814
Flag of Mont-Terrible
Dyle and other annexed departments
Dyle and other annexed departments
StatusDepartment of the French First Republic and the French First Empire
Chef-lieuBruxelles
50°50′N 04°21′E / 50.833°N 4.350°E / 50.833; 4.350
Official languagesFrench
Common languagesDutch
Historical eraFrench Revolutionary Wars
• Creation
1 October 1795
• Treaty of Paris, disestablished
30 May 1814
Area
18123,428 km2 (1,324 sq mi)
Population
• 1784
390,535[1]
• 1800
363,661[2]
• 1806
432,019[1]
• 1812
431,969[3]
Preceded by Succeeded by
Austrian Netherlands
Prince-Bishopric of Liège
United Kingdom of the Netherlands
Today part of

Dyle ([dil], Dutch: Dijle) was a department of the French First Republic and French First Empire in present-day Belgium. It was named after the river Dyle (Dijle), which flows through the department. Its territory corresponded more or less with that of the Belgian province of Brabant, now divided into Walloon Brabant, Flemish Brabant and the Brussels-Capital Region. It was created on 1 October 1795, when the Austrian Netherlands and the Prince-Bishopric of Liège were officially annexed by the French Republic.[4] Before the annexation, its territory was partly in the Duchy of Brabant, partly in the County of Hainaut, and partly in some smaller territories.

The Chef-lieu of the department was the City of Brussels (Bruxelles in French). The department was subdivided into the following three arrondissements and cantons (as of 1812):[5]

After the defeat of Napoleon the department became part of the United Kingdom of the Netherlands, as the province of (South) Brabant.

Administration

Prefects

The Prefect was the highest state representative in the department.

Term start Term end Office holder
2 March 1800[6] 1 February 1805 Louis Gustave le Doulcet de Pontécoulant
1 February 1805[7] 12 May 1808 François Louis René Mouchard de Chaban
12 May 1808[8] 12 March 1813 Frédéric Séraphin de la Tour du Pin Gouvernet
12 March 1813[9] 30 May 1814 Frédéric Christophe d'Houdetot

General Secretaries

The General Secretary was the deputy to the Prefect.

Term start Term end Office holder
26 April 1800[10] ?? ?? 1806 Joseph Claude Anne Le Gras de Bercagny
?? ?? 1806 30 May 1814 Jean Jacques Victor Verseyden de Varick

Subprefects of Bruxelles

The office of Subprefect of Bruxelles was held by the Prefect until 1811.

Term start Term end Office holder
14 January 1811[11] 30 May 1814 Jean Pierre Henri Amédée Marbotin de Conteneuil

Subprefects of Louvain

Term start Term end Office holder
1 June 1800[11] 17 May 1810 Duchastel
17 May 1810[11] 30 May 1814 Sterckx

Subprefects of Nivelles

Term start Term end Office holder
25 April 1800[11] 26 December 1811 Bauduin Joseph Ghislain Berlaimont
26 December 1811[11] 30 May 1814 Martin de Bussy-Boulancy

References

  1. ^ a b Massin, Antoine (1812). Almanach du Département de la Dyle (PDF). A.J.D. De Braeckenier. p. 63.
  2. ^ Oudiette, Charles (1804). Dictionnaire géographique et topographique des treize départements de la Belgique et de la rive gauche du Rhin. Imprimerie de Cramer. p. XIII.
  3. ^ Almanach Impérial. Imprimerie de Sa Majesté. 1812. p. 396.
  4. ^ Duvergier, Jean-Baptiste (1835). Collection complète des lois, décrets, ordonnances, réglemens et avis du Conseil d'état, t. 8. p. 300.
  5. ^ Mémoire statistique du département de la Dyle. Imprimerie de Sa Majesté. 1804.
  6. ^ Archives Nationales. "LE DOULCET DE PONTÉCOULANT, Louis Gustave". francearchives.fr. Retrieved 21 June 2019.
  7. ^ Archives Nationales. "MOUCHARD DE CHABAN, François Louis René". francearchives.fr. Retrieved 21 June 2019.
  8. ^ Archives Nationales. "DE LA TOUR DU PIN GOUVERNET, Frédéric Séraphin". francearchives.fr. Retrieved 21 June 2019.
  9. ^ Archives Nationales. "HOUDETOT, Frédéric Christophe d'". francearchives.fr. Retrieved 21 June 2019.
  10. ^ Archives Nationales. "LEGRAS DE BERCAGNY, Joseph Claude Anne". francearchives.fr. Retrieved 21 June 2019.
  11. ^ a b c d e Tulard, Jean & Marie-José (2014). Napoléon et 40 millions de sujets: La centralisation et le premier empire. p. 291. ISBN 9791021001480.

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