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George Floyd protests

George Floyd protests
Part of Police brutality in the United States
A protester stands on a police car with a smashed windowshield outside the Target in the Midway area of St Paul, Minnesota (49946336068).jpg
Protesters outside the Minneapolis 3rd Police Precinct May 28 2020.jpg
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Minneapolis 05-28-20 (49947574981).jpg
Minnesota State Patrol stand at E Lake St and 29th Ave S in Minneapolis, Minnesota (49949772331).jpg
A man stands on a burned out car on Thursday morning as fires burn behind him in the Lake St area of Minneapolis, Minnesota (49945886467).jpg
A collection of various protest scenes in Minneapolis–Saint Paul
From top, left to right: A protester standing on a damaged police vehicle, protesters with raised fists outside the Minneapolis Police's 3rd Precinct, protesters overtaking and burning the precinct, protesters confronting police, armored police with military accompaniment, and demonstrators on a torched street with firefighters working in the background.
DateMay 26, 2020 – present
(6 days)
Location
Nationwide United States (protests started in Twin Cities, Minnesota)
Other cities worldwide in solidarity[1]
Caused by
MethodsDemonstrations, civil disobedience, civil resistance, looting, assault, arson and property damage
StatusOngoing
Parties to the civil conflict
Protesters
(no centralized authority)
Lead figures
Protesters
(no centralised leadership)

Supported by:

Deaths, injuries and arrests
Death(s)5 confirmed[5][6][7][8][9][10]
1 unconfirmed[11]
InjuriesUnknown
Arrested3,000+[12][13][14]

The George Floyd protests[15] and riots [16] are an ongoing series of civil disturbances that initially started in the Minneapolis–Saint Paul metropolitan area of Minnesota, United States, before spreading nationwide. Unrest began in Minneapolis on May 26, 2020, after George Floyd died shortly after Minneapolis Police Department (MPD) officer Derek Chauvin knelt on his neck for 8 minutes and 46 seconds during an arrest the day before.

Protests at the MPD's Third Precinct[17] saw some demonstrators skirmishing with law enforcement officers, who fired tear gas and rubber bullets.[18][19] On May 27, one man was fatally shot by a pawn shop owner who thought the man was looting, and the Third Precinct's windows were smashed. Multiple stores were looted, and other buildings were attacked and set ablaze.[5]

For several days following Floyd's death, hundreds of protesters gathered at the driveway of Chauvin's house, which prompted police response.[20]

On May 28, Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey declared a state of emergency, and 500 Minnesota National Guard troops were called in by Governor of Minnesota Tim Walz.[21] By the morning more businesses across the Twin Cities were damaged and looted. MPD in the Third Precinct building attempted to hold off the protesters with tear gas, but at around 11:00p.m., protesters overran the building and set it ablaze after it was evacuated.[22]

Unrest continued into May 30. Tim Walz, Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey, and Saint Paul Mayor Melvin Carter imposed curfews.[23] President Donald Trump assured Walz of military support if needed.[24]

There were simultaneous protests in many other cities supporting those seeking justice for Floyd and the Black Lives Matter movement and speaking out against police brutality, including Atlanta; Charlotte; Chicago; Columbus; Dallas; Denver; Jacksonville; Los Angeles; New York City; Phoenix; Portland, Oregon; Richmond, Virginia; San Francisco; Seattle; and Washington, D.C.

Background

The numerous cases of fatal use of force by law enforcement officers, particularly those against African Americans, have been a flashpoint for accusations of police brutality in the United States and racial discrimination. Civil activists have actively protested against the use of excessive force by police officers and the lack of police accountability. These have included the 2014 shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, the 2016 shooting of Philando Castile in Minnesota[25] and death of Eric Garner in New York City, who, similarly to George Floyd, said, "I can't breathe".[26] In early 2020, well publicized examples included the shooting of Breonna Taylor of Kentucky in March[27] and the shooting of Ahmaud Arbery in Georgia in February, though nobody was charged in Arbery's case until video of his death was released in May.[28]

Minneapolis is one of the most racially unequal cities in the nation, with the average black family making less than half of the average white family.[29] In response to the COVID-19 pandemic in Minnesota, non-essential businesses were closed on March 16[30] and a stay-at-home order was implemented over a week later on March 25.[31] Among the millions of Americans who lost their jobs and were made more economically vulnerable was George Floyd.[32] Keith Ellison, Attorney General of Minnesota, opined that people "have been cooped up for two months, and so now they're in a different space and a different place. They're restless. Some of them have been unemployed, some of them don't have rent money, and they're angry, they're frustrated.[33]

Death of George Floyd

Memorial at the site of Floyd's death

On May 25, 2020, at 8:08p.m. CDT,[34] MPD officers responded to a 9-1-1 call regarding a "forgery in progress" on Chicago Avenue South in the Powderhorn neighborhood of Minneapolis. According to police, George Floyd, a 46-year-old African American man, was in a nearby car and "appeared to be under the influence." A spokesman for the police department said the officers ordered him to exit the vehicle, at which point he "physically resisted." A video taken by a bystander shows Floyd being removed from his vehicle without any resistance.[35]

According to the MPD, officers "were able to get the suspect into handcuffs and noted he appeared to be suffering medical distress. Officers called for an ambulance." However, a Facebook Live livestream recorded by a bystander showed that Derek Chauvin, a 48-year-old white police officer, had pinned Floyd on the ground and was kneeling on his neck.[36][37] Floyd repeatedly tells Chauvin "Please" and "I can't breathe", while a bystander is heard telling the police officer, "You got him down. Let him breathe."[38] After some time, a bystander points out that Floyd was bleeding from his nose while another bystander tells the police that Floyd is "not even resisting arrest right now", to which the police tell the bystanders that Floyd was "talking, he's fine". A bystander replies saying Floyd "ain't fine". A bystander then protests that the police were preventing Floyd from breathing, urging them to "get him off the ground ... You could have put him in the car by now. He's not resisting arrest or nothing."[37]

Floyd then goes silent and motionless. An ambulance arrives and Chauvin does not remove his knee until emergency medical services put Floyd on a stretcher. Not only did Chauvin kneel on Floyd's neck for about seven minutes (four minutes of which were after Floyd stopped moving) but a later video showed that an additional two officers had also knelt on Floyd while another officer watched.[39][40] Medics were unable to detect a pulse, and Floyd was pronounced dead at the hospital.[41]

An autopsy of Floyd was conducted on May 26, and the next day, the preliminary report by the Hennepin County Medical Examiner's Office was published, stating "no physical findings that support a diagnosis of traumatic asphyxia or strangulation". Floyd's underlying health conditions included coronary artery disease and hypertensive heart disease. The report said that "[t]he combined effects of Mr. Floyd being restrained by the police, his underlying health conditions and any potential intoxicants in his system likely contributed to his death". [42]

Video footage of the incident generated widespread national attention and raised questions about the appropriate use of force by law enforcement.

Twin Cities timeline

Day 1: May 26

Minneapolis protesters marching on May 26, the day after Floyd's death

Protests emerged during midday on May 26, the day after Floyd's death.[43] Hundreds of people marched to the MPD 3rd Precinct police station to voice their frustration with the Minneapolis police.[44][45] The protest turned violent as the 3rd Precinct became vandalized with spray paint,[46] and police squad cars had rocks thrown at them.[47] In what appeared to be a standoff around 8:00 p.m. CDT that night, police in riot gear fired beanbag rounds and chemical agents at protesters, who threw water bottles at them.[48]

Day 2: May 27

Street medics tending to a protestor sprayed with chemical irritants

The protests continued into May 27, including at Chicago Avenue South. Around 6:00 p.m., police fired rubber bullets and chemical irritants near Hiawatha Avenue and Lake Street while protesters were breaking windows at the police precinct.[49] In the early evening, a white man wearing black protective gear and a face mask respirator, and holding an umbrella, walked casually up to the Autozone next to the police department and smashed the windows of the building with a hammer as passersby told him to stop.[50] There was speculation that the man was an agent provocateur trying to introduce vandalism into a peaceful protest.[51] Social media users claimed the man holding an umbrella was an undercover Saint Paul Police officer; the Saint Paul Police Department issued a statement via Twitter denying the claims.[52][53]

Later in the evening, videos circulated on Twitter, Facebook, and other social media platforms showcasing the Autozone on East Lake Street burning. A nearby Target store was extensively looted by a crowd of at least 100 people.[54] That night, one man was fatally shot by a pawnshop owner who believed he was burglarizing his business. The owner, a 59-year-old man, was arrested in connection to the death.[55]

Day 3: May 28

Protestor with an "I can't breathe" sign
Firefighters observing the damage in Minneapolis the afternoon of May 28.

A state of emergency was declared in Minneapolis on May 28 by Mayor Jacob Frey, and 500 Minnesota National Guard troops were deployed to the Twin Cities area.[56]

By the morning, more than 30 businesses in Minneapolis had been damaged by rioters.[5] A Dollar Tree store and another Target store were looted, and a Wendy's restaurant was set ablaze.[17] The Saint Paul Police Department reported that 170 businesses were damaged or looted on Thursday, and dozens of fires were started.[57] On the evening of May 28, protesters near the 3rd District Police Station set ablaze nearby buildings on two sides. Fencing surrounding the facility was torn down, so police on the scene used tear gas against protesters while the tensions and blaze continued. The Third Precinct building was overrun by protesters later in the night, and the building itself set on fire.[58][59]

Graffiti displaying the anarchist slogan "No Gods No Masters" modified with a reference to "420".

A viral video emerged of a woman in a wheelchair outside of the Lake Street Target seemingly attacking looters with some sort of knife. The video circulated on social media, was posted with the caption "She's stabbing people". A second video appeared, which showed the woman being disarmed and sprayed with a fire extinguisher. Edited versions of the original video, removing the caption and the audio of people claiming she had a knife, were spread. "She's 30," "SHE GOT A KNIFE," and "SHE CAN WALK" were all trending topics. In a follow-up video, the woman said she "was peacefully protesting and trying to block the way so they couldn't leave."[60] She also said:

They attacked me from front and back... they punched me in my mouth, my head, I got punched in the head several times. I got grabbed from behind, people grabbed my wheelchair and they stole my keys. They stole everything they could off of me. I got maced in the face, I got covered in fire extinguisher stuff. I already seen the EMTs and they told me to go home.[60]

Day 4: May 29

Citizens attempt to put out a fire in Minneapolis with buckets of water around 5 a.m. on May 29
External video
Press conference with Minnesota Governor Tim Walz, May 29, 2020, C-SPAN

There were no police, fire, or EMS presence in the area where the riots occurred from around 10:00p.m. CDT on May 28, and continued to have no presence until the early hours of May 29.[61] At 1:30 am CDT on May 29, Frey held a press conference regarding the riots, and condemned the actions of the looters as "unacceptable." Frey said individuals engaged in rioting will be "held accountable" for damage caused to the community, and that Minneapolis is "strong as hell".[62][63]

Later that morning at 5:11 am CDT, CNN reporter Omar Jimenez, who is of African-American and Colombian descent,[64] and camera crew were arrested by Minnesota State Patrol officers as Jimenez reported live on television.[65][66] Jimenez identified himself and the crew as journalists.[67] Authorities said the team did not follow orders and detained them.[65] CNN released a statement saying that the arrest violated the First Amendment rights of the reporters, and calling for their immediate release.[68] The crew was released about an hour later,[69] after an intervention from the Governor of Minnesota, Tim Walz.[70][71]

Minnesota State Patrol

On May 29, President Donald Trump posted on Twitter that he would send the military to Minneapolis in order to bring the riots under control if the Governor was unable to; this came after the Governor Walz signed an executive order to send the Minnesota National Guard to Minneapolis, officially to protect property and to allow the local firefighters to do their job.[72] This move follows Trump's tweet earlier that day, in which he criticized Minneapolis' "very weak Radical Left Mayor, Jacob Frey," and his lack of control of the riots.[73]

Late that afternoon, Walz imposed a curfew for the cities of Minneapolis and Saint Paul that would run from 8:00 p.m. to 6:00 a.m. on Friday, May 29 and Saturday, May 30.[74][75] Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey also issued a similar curfew.[76] Kirk Varner, news director at local ABC affiliate KSTP-TV, released a statement after allegations surfaced that assignment reporter Rich Reeve was inciting violence by playing gunshot noises on his phone to incite a reaction. In an attempt to stop conspiracy theories circulating on social media, the station released the video in full, showing a man who was firing a gun into the air while protesters were passing by, which Reeve had subsequently replayed to nearby protesters inquiring about the incident.[77]

Boarded up business with graffiti

Derek Chauvin was charged with third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter on May 29.[78][79] His wife said that night that she would be filing for divorce.[80] Despite the announcement of the charges and the new curfew, riots broke out again on Friday night and well into early Saturday morning,[81] with Ben Crump, the lawyer representing Floyd's family, stating that "We expected a first-degree murder charge. We want a first-degree murder charge. And we want to see the other officers arrested".[82] Law enforcement presence was reportedly "undetectable", as violence in Minneapolis quickly expanded until just before midnight, when police officers, state troopers, and members of the National Guard began confronting rioters with tear gas and mass force.[81] Associated Press reported that the Pentagon placed members of the Military Police Corps from Fort Bragg and Fort Drum on stand-by, preparing to deploy to the Twin Cities.[83] Officials had said the 350 police officers at the site of the rioting were vastly outnumbered by the crowds.[84] However, Governor Tim Waltz declined this request and said that they would be relying on the National Guard instead. [85]

Day 5: May 30

Cleaning the streets and sidewalks of debris next to a burnt out building on May 30

Governor Walz held a press conference at 1:30 am CDT on May 30, in which he said that as much as 80% of people causing destruction and lighting fires could be from outside the state. Walz said the rioters were a "tightly controlled" group in "an organized attempt to destabilize civil society"; the Star Tribune said, "It was not clear if the outside groups suspected to be playing a part in the mayhem are made up of white supremacist agitators, left wing anarchists, or both."[86][87] "This is not grieving, and this is not making a statement ... this is life-threatening, dangerous to the most well-qualified forces to deal with this," Walz said. "This is not about George’s death. This is about chaos being caused." Minneapolis Mayor Frey was also present at the press conference, and he urged rioters to go to their homes. "If you care about your community, you’ve got to put this to an end. It needs to stop," Frey said. "You're not getting back at the police officer that tragically killed George Floyd by looting."[84] Trump tweeted that 'left-wing anarchists' and Antifa were responsible for the destruction, however he offered no evidence for this claim.[88] Crowds of people gathered in a makeshift memorial at the site of Floyd's arrest and subsequent death.[89]

The White House went into lockdown on the evening of the 30th after violent clashes between uniformed Secret Service officers occurred with protesters at the gates of the White House.

As of May 30, 2,500 officers were deployed and 50 people have been arrested in relation to the protests. Major General Jon Jensen of the Minnesota National Guard said that by May 31, over 1,700 National Guard soldiers could be deployed. This would be the largest national deployment in the state's history.[90] Jensen confirmed that 2,500 Guards would be deployed by noon.[91]

Protests elsewhere

George Floyd protests is located in the United States
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Cities with over 100 protesters as of 30 May 2020

There were simultaneous protests in over 100 cities in the United States and internationally, with demonstrators supporting those seeking justice for Floyd and the Black Lives Matter movement, and speaking out against police brutality. Cities with major protests included Atlanta, Charlotte, Denver, Los Angeles, New York City, Miami, Phoenix, Richmond, Virginia, and Washington, D.C.[92][93][94] The bulk of these protests were peaceful, but many of them turned violent as the violence in the Twin Cities riots increased.

United States

Protesters in Washington, D.C.
  • Atlanta, Georgia: A peaceful march was planned for May 29 at Centennial Olympic Park and was attended by hundreds. At around 6:00p.m. ET, protesters then marched to the CNN Center, which was then vandalized by protesters at around 7:00p.m. Specifically, some protesters vandalized CNN's logo outside its offices, broke the building's glass, and entered the center at around 9:00p.m. and destroyed its interior.[95] As tensions between protesters and police escalated, police began using tear gas on protesters. Protesters threw water bottles, eggs, and other objects at officers, burned police cars, and defaced businesses. The College Football Hall of Fame's gift shop was looted; Hall of Fame CEO Kimberly Beaudin told ESPN that "no artifacts or displays were damaged".[96] Three officers were injured in the clashes.[97][98] At midnight on May 30, Governor Brian Kemp declared a state of emergency in Fulton County and authorized 500 National Guard members to aid law enforcement in the city.[99] At 2:12 am, a video was uploaded to Twitter, showing what appeared to be children in riot gear deployed outside Lenox Square.[100][101] Local black leaders, including Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms and rapper and activist Killer Mike, decried the riots.[102]
  • Columbia, South Carolina: A march occurred on May 30 at the statehouse.[103]
  • Denver, Colorado: Protesters marched for four hours, blocking traffic on Interstate 25 and demonstrating at the Colorado State Capitol.[104] Multiple gunshots were fired there, and police also fired rubber bullets and shot gas canisters at the crowd.[105] Several properties were damaged. Some protesters also crowded onto 6th Street Mall and toward Interstate 25 via 20th Street and blocked traffic.[106] One video appears to show a vehicle intentionally hitting a protester who had gotten onto the hood of the car. It is not clear what occurred before this—according to the woman who filmed the incident, the man jumped on top of the vehicle before she began filming.[107] Three police officers were injured in clashes with protesters, one of whom had to go to a hospital. None of the injuries were life-threatening. In addition, 13 protesters were arrested.[108][needs update] On May 30, Mayor Michael Hancock implemented a citywide curfew from 8:00 p.m. to 5:00 a.m.[109]
Protestors in Des Moines, Iowa
  • Des Moines, Iowa: Hundreds of protesters clashed with police downtown. Some protesters threw bottles, rocks, bricks, and fire crackers at officers. Some were also seen smashing windows of a Hilltop Tire service and then going inside. The federal courthouse had its doors and windows broken.[110] Tear gas and pepper spray were used.[110]
  • Eugene, Oregon: Hundreds of people protested downtown. Some protesters disrupted traffic and knocked trash and newsstands into the street in the downtown. Rioters crowded on to Highway I-105 and began setting fire to a nearby road sign. Around 11 p.m., they created a bonfire in the street, consisting of throwing in traffic cones, newspapers, signs from local businesses, and other items.[111]
  • Hartford, Connecticut: Hundreds of people protested in front of the Capitol.[112]
  • Honolulu, Hawaii: More than 100 protesters gathered in front of the State Capitol.[113]
  • Jackson, Mississippi: A group peacefully protested outside the Mississippi state capitol and marched through downtown Jackson.[114]
  • Kansas City, Missouri: Hundreds of protesters marched from the Country Club Plaza to the Westport, where police used pepper spray.[115] Some protesters sat in the middle of the street, leading several streets near the intersection of J.C. Nichols Parkway and Emmanuel Cleaver II Boulevard were closed for hours.[116] Some protesters blocked a window and picked up a type 3 traffic barricade, leading police to believe they would use it to commit violence.[117]
  • Las Vegas, Nevada: Hundreds of protesters gathered on the strip leading to 80 arrests, including 2 journalists[118], and the injuries of twelve police officers. Some protesters threw water bottles and rocks at police.[119][120][121]
  • Lincoln, Nebraska: In the morning, people gathered at the Capitol to protest.[122] Overnight, people gathered at around 27th and O Streets to protest.[123] Eight police officers were injured with one requiring advanced medical treatment, several businesses and police vehicles were damaged.[124] Tear gas and rubber bullets were used, and arrests were made.[123]
  • Little Rock, Arkansas: Hundreds gathered on the steps of the State Capitol for a peaceful protest to demand change for voices who can't speak like George Floyd's.[125] A new mural was also added on West 7th Street.[126]
  • Milwaukee, Wisconsin: Dozens of protesters blocked highways and organized a vehicle procession that traveled several miles. There were reports of looting and mild arson at a Walgreen's pharmacy,[127] as well as the looting of a Boost Mobile store.[128] Several other businesses were damaged.[129] In addition, one police officer was mildly injured by gunfire.[127]
  • Missoula, Montana: Hundreds of people peacefully protested outside the Missoula County Courthouse.[130]
  • New Orleans, Louisiana: On Friday, May 29, about 50 people protested at the intersection of North Claiborne and Esplanade Avenues; the demonstration continued for several hours.[131][132]
  • Omaha, Nebraska: Thousands of people protested.[133] The protests were largely peaceful until around 10:30p.m.[133] A small number of people broke the law, and 18 arrests were made due to failure to disperse.[133][134] Several businesses were damaged. Some protesters threw objects such as shoes and water bottles at police. At one point protesters surrounded a police vehicle. Two officers were injured during the riots.[135][136] Tear gas and pepper balls were used.[133]
  • Petal, Mississippi: At least 200 people protested outside Petal City Hall on Friday night after Mayor Hal Marx made about George Floyd's murder not being unreasonable. One elderly woman walked three miles in chains to get to the protest.[137]
  • Phoenix, Arizona: Hundreds protested, with the police using pepper spray and tear gas.[138] Protesters allegedly destroyed windows and doors to the Arizona Federal Theater and a City of Phoenix government building, as well as several other municipal and private businesses and parked cars. Some lit fireworks and fired shots into the air.[90][139]
  • Portland, Maine: Hundreds of people protested peacefully downtown.[140] One group blocked Franklin Street.[140] There was no evidence of violence and no arrests were made.[140]
  • Portland, Oregon: Hundreds attended a vigil for George Floyd in North Portland. Later a larger protest consisting of thousands started, which resulted in Portland declaring a state of emergency after it turned into a riot following several shootings and fires. Mobs broke into Pioneer Place Mall, an Apple store, and several other businesses and looted stores.[90][141][142] Some rioters vandalized the Justice Center, breaking windows, painting graffiti, and starting a fire. A Capital One bank was set ablaze as well. Two men were seen throwing a scooter and a bicycle at a police cruiser. Several people also climbed onto the cruiser’s roof.[143]
Demonstration in Charlottesville, Virginia on May 30
  • Richmond, Virginia: On May 29, a group of several hundred protesters gathered near Monroe Park in what began as a peaceful march, but escalated into a clash with Virginia Commonwealth University police, City of Richmond police, and Virginia Capitol Police.[144] A VCU police cruiser was set on fire and destroyed.[145] A GRTC Pulse bus was also destroyed by protesters. After destroying the bus rioters went on top of it, spray painted it, and yelled “black lives matter.” They also set off fireworks, broke windows at Richmond Police Headquarters, set dumpsters on fire, and damaged other properties. Several journalists were assaulted and a local news station’s vehicle was vandalized.[146][147]
  • Salt Lake City, Utah: On Friday, around 150 to 200 people protested downtown at 900 South and State Street.[148] The protests later turned violent on Saturday, as protesters overturned a SLCPD police cruiser and set it ablaze. There have been reports of vandalism and looting.[149][150] Protestors vandalized parts of the Utah State Capitol Building. Overall, the majority of demonstrations have been peaceful, with thousands being reported marching through the streets.[151]
  • Seattle, Washington: On Saturday, thousands of people gathered in a protest in downtown Seattle at Westlake Center. Both directions of Interstate 5 were closed and protesters marched on the freeway.[152] The day before (May 29), they began protesting by smashing windows of several stores in Downtown Seattle and Capitol Hill.[153]On May 30th, a state of emergency was declared and a 5 pm curfew was enacted.[154]
  • St. Louis, Missouri: Hundreds of protesters marched downtown.[155] Protesters shut down part of Interstate 64 and Interstate 70. Some set off fireworks at the interstate. Protesters also blocked traffic in the downtown. One protester died after being dragged by a FedEx truck as it tried to slowly drive through North Broadway and O'Fallon Street.[156][157] The driver of the truck attempted to drive away after two men displayed guns at him and others began to take items from his truck.[10]
  • Washington, D.C.: The White House was on lockdown Friday night in response to protests reaching the gates.[158] The protests begun at 7:00p.m..[159] By 8:30p.m. the White House lockdown was lifted as protesters began to leave.[159] At 10:00p.m. the protesters returned however by 3:30 am Saturday the protesters were more subdued.[159] The protesters came into conflict with the secret service.[159] At times the protesters got close enough to inflict minor injuries on certain officers.[159] At one point the protesters were pepper sprayed.[159] President Donald Trump responded to the protesters with a tweet saying that they would have been attacked by "vicious dogs".[160] On May 30, The Secret Services reported that six people were arrested in Lafayette Park, the previous night. This contradicts an earlier tweet from President Trump in which he criticized Washington, DC, Mayor Muriel Bowser for lack of involvement.[161] Protesters gathered around the White House again on May 30.[162] Police vehicles soon became damaged with one protester graffiting " words disparaging the President".[163]
  • Wilmington, Delaware: Protesters blocked part of I-95 for several hours.[164] The protests were led by Black Lives Matter and Food Not Bombs.[164]

California

Protestors in Oakland, California on May 29
An Asian American protesting in solidarity in Oakland
A fire in the middle of an Oakland street on May 29
  • Bakersfield: Hundreds of people[a] protested in Downtown Bakersfield on Friday. Rioters vandalized a Fallen Officer memorial and threw rocks and bottles at officers. A group of around 200-300 protesters blocked traffic on Truxtun Avenue. 10 people were arrested.[167] A 31-year-old man, Michael Tran, ran his car into protesters, striking a 15-year-old. Tran was arrested for attempted murder.[166]
  • Fontana: One hundred protesters took to the streets of downtown Fontana. Rioters blocked traffic on Sierra Avenue and threw rocks and bottles at cars and buildings. Some threw bottles at police. Nine arrests were made for vandalism of cars, buildings, and the Fontana City Hall.[168]
  • La Mesa: Dozens of demonstrators gathered outside the La Mesa Police Department on May 29 following another local viral video of the Wednesday arrest of a young black man at a San Diego Trolley station that resulted in an officer being put on leave. Marchers say they felt compelled in light of what's happening nationally.[169][170] On May 30 protesters broke through a police line and made their way to 1-8 where they blocked both sides of traffic.[171]
  • Los Angeles: Protesters blocked traffic and threw rocks at the windows of businesses and passing vehicles. They also set off fireworks which hit several buildings. Looters broke into several stores and stole items such as televisions and jewelry. Buildings were also spray painted. A Starbucks had its windows smashed and painted with slogans such as “End Racism” and “Brown Power Unite." Other damaged and looted businesses included a CVS and a Whole Foods. Thousands of protesters converged on the 110 Freeway, shutting it down temporarily. Several protesters scuffled with police, which resulted in two officer injuries.[172] Police begun to use batons and rubber bullets against the protesters.[173] Protestors protested on May 30 at Pan Pacific Park located on Beverly Boulevard near the tony shopping center The Grove. Police and protestors stopped traffic and cars exploded on live national news. [174]
  • Oakland: On May 29, hundreds of protesters gathered near the Oakland Police Department headquarters in downtown Oakland. Some protesters set off fireworks and threw bottles at police. Police fired flash-bang grenades and tear gas at the crowd. Many businesses in the area were ransacked or had their windows smashed. Several dozen protesters blocked traffic on Interstate 880, stopping traffic in both directions for about half an hour.[68] Oakland police department reported arrests but didn't provide any specific details. Two Federal Protective Services officers were shot during the riot, one of whom died.[7] This incident was labelled by Department of Homeland Security Acting Deputy Secretary Ken Cuccinelli as an "act of domestic terrorism".[175] In addition, six police officers and seven civilians were injured in clashes elsewhere in the city.[176]
  • Orange: On May 30, hundreds marched at the Orange Plaza.[177]
  • Sacramento: Hundreds of people protested peacefully on Franklin Boulevard. A group of protesters jumped onto Highway 99 southbound at the 12th Avenue overpass and traffic. [178] On May 30 protesters blocked part of I-5 and marched downtown. [179]
  • San Diego: A car caravan organized by the "Racial Justice Coalition" drove through the Point Loma neighborhood. They intended to deliver a message to Mayor Kevin Faulconer at his home, but San Diego Police had barricaded the street.[180]
  • San Francisco: A protest is planned at the UN Plaza the afternoon of May 30.[181]
  • San Jose: On May 29, hundreds of protesters blocked traffic on Highway 101, then marched to City Hall.[68][182] At Highway 101 some people in the group were seen attacking vehicles.[183] One man was filmed smashing a car’s window while a woman pulled on the doors and yelled at the occupants to get out.[184] Protesters also blocked Interstate 880. Some threw bottles and rocks and launched firecrackers at police, injuring some officers. Many businesses and properties had their windows smashed and were ransacked. Some rioters also used graffiti to vandalize. One crowd started a fire on Broadway and fed it with debris and construction barricades.[185]
  • Santa Cruz: Protests were held on Pacific Avenue on May 30, in which hundreds including the Santa Cruz Police Chief participated.[186]
  • Santa Rosa: Protests were held starting in downtown Santa Rosa and continuing onto Mendocino Avenue.[187]
  • Vallejo: About 100 protesters marched from Wilson Park to the Vallejo Police Department station on May 28.[188]

Florida

  • Coral Gables: About 100 people participated in a protest that was coordinated with the local police department.[189] The protest had sparked controversy because people have said it was not led by blacks and that police officers had been invited to participate.[190]
  • Gainesville: A man drove through a crowd of protesters and pulled out a gun.[191] The man was arrested and charged with aggravated assault.[191]
  • Jacksonville: Thousands of people protested downtown, with organizers emphasizing keeping the protest peaceful.[192] A demonstration was held in front of the Jacksonville Sheriff's Office.[192]
  • Miami: On May 30, about 400 to 500 people protested downtown; as of 7pm on Saturday, no arrests had been made.[189] On Saturday evening, protesters marched onto and shut down Interstate 95 for over an hour in both directions.[189]
  • Orlando: A large crowd of people protested peacefully.[191]
  • St. Petersburg: Hundreds of people protested peacefully as they marched from City Hall to police headquarters.[191]
  • Tallahassee: A truck drove through a crowd of people protesting downtown.[193]
  • Tampa Bay: Hundreds of people protested peacefully downtown.[191]
  • Temple Terrace: Hundreds of people protested while traversing the city, blocking traffic at points.[191] Protesters stated that rubber bullets were used.[191]
  • Windermere: More than 200 protesters gathered outside Chauvin's summer home.[194]

Illinois

  • Bloomington: On May 29, a group of around 10 to 15 protesters gathered during the evening and demonstrated at the median of the intersection of Veterans Parkway and Clearwater Avenue. Protesters stated that the event initially consisted of a small group of people, but others eventually joined the demonstration.[195]
  • Chicago: Protesters gathered on May 29 in Millennium Park and marched through the Loop chanting Floyd's name.[196] Demonstrators shut down several downtown streets and blocked traffic on the Eisenhower Expressway. Near the intersection of State and Harrison streets, several protesters were seen throwing bottles and climbing onto cars.[197][198] One individual was arrested while carrying a gun.[199] A small group of protesters demonstrated in front of Trump Tower near midnight.[198] The protesters eventually broke up once they reached the Near North Side neighborhood, and protests eventually died down by the early-morning hours. On May 30 the Chicago Police reported multiple arrests, injured police officers and damaged property.[200] About a dozen officers were injured, including one who suffered a broken wrist.[201] Around 108 arrests were confirmed on the night of May 29–30, and Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot called on protesters to remain peaceful, stating that "it's not easy when we have a president who is inciting violence. Let’s be better than him". Around 4:30 am CDT on May 30, a board-up company was sighted covering the windows of the State Street Old Navy location, and the Champs store near the intersection of State and Madison streets had several damaged windows. "Multiple marches" were expected throughout the weekend.[202] Another demonstration was planned for 2:00 pm on Saturday the 30th, and Mayor Lightfoot stated that "we’re not going to tolerate” lawlessness. A large downtown parking ban was enacted, with vehicles unable to park anywhere from Chicago Avenue in the north to Congress Parkway in the south, and from Lake Shore Drive in the east to Wells Street in the west, roughly correlating to the downtown area plus the Magnificent Mile and River North neighborhoods.[198]
  • Joliet: On May 29, a Black Lives Matter protest began at 2:00p.m. at the intersection of Caton Farm Road and Route 59. The event was scheduled to end at 4:30p.m., and around 100 protesters had gathered by 3:00p.m.. The demonstration remained peaceful, and one group consisted of local high school students.[203]

Indiana

  • Fort Wayne: Crowds gathered outside the courthouse in a peaceful demonstration that turned violent after police fired off tear gas. Some establishments were vandalized. Protesters blocked traffic on Clinton Street and then began sitting in the road at Clinton and Main Street.[204]
  • Indianapolis: Protesters and police clashed downtown. Some protesters broke windows of businesses. Several officers were injured.[205] Tear gas and rubber bullets were used to disperse crowds.[205]

Kentucky

  • Bowling Green: People protested outside the Bowling Green Police Department.[206] During the protest, 24-year-old James Hunton hit a protester with a Silverado pickup truck, and was arrested.[206] Police state that Hunton "had plenty of room ... to avoid hitting protesters", and that when they asked if his vehicle had hit the protester, Hunton replied, "Probably so, there were protesters blocking the ****ing road, they deserved to be hit, anyone would".[b][206] Hunton was arrested, charged with wanton endangerment in the first degree (a felony in Kentucky), and taken to Warren County Regional Jail.[206][207]
  • Louisville: On May 28, protesters demanded justice for the death of Breonna Taylor. Some 500 to 600 demonstrators marched through the city that evening.[208] Later during the protest, seven people were shot by an unknown shooter or shooters, with one victim critically injured.[209] During the night of May 29, more protests took place, attended by hundreds of people. A woman suffered a heart attack as a result of tear gas inhalation, and two journalists were injured by rubber bullets fired by police officers.[210] On May 30, the governor called in the National Guard.[211]

Massachusetts

  • Boston: A group of several hundred protesters gathered in Peters Park on Thursday, May 28, in what began as a peaceful demonstration, but escalated into a clash with police after several dozen protesters crowded around the nearby Precinct 4 police station. Several protesters were pepper sprayed.[212][213] The following day, a second large group of protestors clashed with city police, injuring four officers and resulting in ten arrests.[214]
  • Framingham: On Thursday, May 28, a group of about thirty protesters peacefully gathered and crowded along sidewalks in the city.[215]
  • Springfield: Several hundred people peacefully protested outside of the city police‘s headquarters on Friday, May 29.[216]
  • Amherst: More than sixty people peacefully gathered across from the police station on Saturday, May 30.[217]

Michigan

  • Detroit: Hundreds protested in downtown Detroit. Some protesters were seen throwing items at police officers and taunting them.[218] At least 61 people were arrested.[219] On Friday night a 21-year-old man was shot and killed around 11:30 p.m. He was killed after an unknown assailant fired shots into a vehicle. The man was taken to an hospital where he died.[220] It was initially thought that this man was 19 years old and that the assailant fired from a vehicle; this was later proven otherwise.[8][221][90]
  • Marquette: A number of protesters gathered outside the city's post office on May 29.[222]

New Jersey

  • Englewood: More than 1000 people rallied in Mackay Park before peacefully marching to the Englewood Police Station.[223]
  • Newark: A crowd of at least 5,000 marched peacefully down Market Street on Saturday at a rally organized by "People's Organization for Progress."[223]
  • Paterson: A rally intended for George Floyd was attended by family members of Jameek Lowery who died after an encounter with the Paterson Police in 2019.[224][225]

New Mexico

  • Albuquerque, New Mexico: Hundreds of people protested, and tear gas was deployed, but no one was injured.[226] Part of the city was shut down. Several shots were fired from a vehicle in the area of Wisconsin and Central, while a female sergeant was approached by several people and had her vehicle damaged. Four people were taken into custody. Several rioters were seen on camera approaching vehicles and were attempting to damage the vehicles and drag civilians out of their cars. One vehicle in particular was driving around firing shots. It is unclear how many shots were fired by that specific vehicle, though shot spotter technology determined that there were about 33 total registered reports of shots fired in the area. Police were able to initiate a traffic stop and take four individuals into custody, including one who initially fled on foot. While officers were trying to process the scene, a group of people started to cause problems for the officers. One person allegedly used a baseball bat to hit several police vehicles, breaking the windows.[227]*
  • Santa Fe: About 250 people protested at the state capitol.[228]

New York

  • Albany: A large rally organized by Citizen Action peacefully protested with a "solidarity walk" that began at Townsend Park on May 30.[229]
  • New York City: Nearly 100 protesters assembled in Union Square on May 28; 72 protesters were arrested[230], five of whom were charged with assaulting police officers,[230] and several police officers were lightly injured. Protesters marched to City Hall and shut down traffic in Lower Manhattan.[231][232][233] In Manhattan, one protester punched an officer in the face, while another threw a garbage can at an officer, striking him on the head.[234] Protesters also threw bottles at police officers.[235] The following day, May 29, peaceful protests resumed around Foley Square in Manhattan, but later protesters clashed with police at Barclays Center in Brooklyn and demolished two police vehicles in the Fort Greene neighborhood.[230] Protesters also attempted to breach the 79th precinct in Bedford–Stuyvesant, Brooklyn, but were repelled. Additional confrontations took place at Fort Greene Park. Some protesters threw projectiles at the police. One allegedly punched an officer with brass knuckles. One woman allegedly threw a Molotov cocktail into an occupied police car. She was later charged with attempted murder. A police van was also torched.[236][237] Twelve police officers total were injured during the clashes, and at least 200 arrested. On May 30, New York Governer Andrew Cuomo spoke with New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio and announced an independent review, done by Attorney General Letitia James, of the actions taken during the protests.[238]
  • Rochester: Following a peaceful protest from 1 PM to 4 PM in downtown Rochester on May 30, chaos erupted to the point of cars, including police cruisers, being set on fire around the Public Safety building and other parts of the city, with police responding with tear gas and pepper spray. Violence and looting also broke out in the suburb of Irondequoit. Monroe County Executive Adam Bello and Rochester mayor Lovely Warren have since issued a state of emergency and have set a county-wide curfew for 9 PM.[239][240] Bello, Warren, and Rochester police chief La'Ron Landry have now claimed that the violence was incited by "professional protesters" and "anarchists" from outside the city.[241]
  • Staten Island: Reverend Al Sharpton, Gwen Carr—the mother of Eric Garner, who was killed in 2014 from being chokeholded by police—and other community activists held a vigil for George Floyd on May 30.[242]

North Carolina

  • Charlotte, North Carolina: Hundreds of protesters marched down Beatties Ford Road.[94] Some protesters threw rocks and bottles at police, smashed the windows of police vehicles and jumped on them, and stole a bike from an officer. Police used pepper spray bullets to break up the riot. Some protesters also smashed store windows and looted in the University Park Shopping Center.[243]
  • Durham, North Carolina: A peaceful protest occurred in Durham on May 30.[244]
  • Raleigh, North Carolina: On May 30, around 1,000 people demonstrated in downtown Raleigh. Officers used tear gas and pepper spray on the crowd.[245]

Ohio

Protestors in Columbus on May 28 blocked by police
Protestor in Columbus
  • Canton: Several hundred people protested.[246] Tear gas was used to disperse the crowd, and at least two arrests were made.[246][247]
  • Cincinnati: Over 500 protesters gathered to protest; the protest began peacefully, with looting and vandalism occurring overnight on May 29.[248] Protesters blocked traffic on Interstate 75.[249] Police used "multiple rounds" of pepper bombs as well as pepper spray canisters to disperse the crowds of protesters.[201] All police are on 12-hour shifts with time off being cancelled to free up space.[201] On May 30, Cincinnati Mayor John Cranley erected a curfew beginning at 10:00 p.m. and ending at 6:00 a.m. on Saturday and Sunday in the downtown area.[201]
  • Cleveland: According to the Cleveland Police Department, the protests starting on Saturday began peaceful however police had to disperse crowds after some protesters began throwing objects.[250]
  • Columbus: Protesters broke into the Ohio Statehouse and vandalized several businesses.[251][252][253][254] At around 7:00p.m. EDT, protesters blocked traffic on Interstate 71 near 15th Street. At around 9:00p.m. protesters began throwing bottles, leading police to disperse pepper spray into the crowd. Some protesters threw the pepper spray back at police officers. Protesters then began throwing eggs, fireworks, smoke bombs, jugs of water, and shoes. Police were able to get the protesters back to N. High St. and State St. There, some protesters broke the windows of businesses and bus stops. They also smashed the front doors and windows of the state capitol building, with some obtaining entrance to the Statehouse. At N. High St. and Town St. some protesters began breaking into businesses and looting from a local convenience store. Additionally, protesters tore trash cans and mailboxes from their mounts.[253][254][255] The Ohio Theatre was also damaged. The Columbus Association for the Performing Arts estimated the damage at $15,000.[256] Protest continued on May 29. Protesters entered the middle of Front Street, disrupting traffic. Some protesters threw water bottles, rocks, and bricks and shot fireworks at officers. More businesses in the Short North district were looted. Five police officers were injured during the protests. The Columbus Police Department declared an emergency. [257][258][259]

Oregon

Graffiti following a demonstration in Eugene, Oregon
  • Eugene: A crowd of around 300 people gathered on May 29 to protest. That night, fires were set and windows were smashed. No arrests were made.[260]
  • Portland: Peaceful protests on May 29 evolved into a riot, which saw a break-in and fire set in the Multnomah County Justice Center and several stores looted. Mayor Ted Wheeler installed a curfew from 8 p.m. Friday to 6 a.m. Saturday and again from 8 p.m. Saturday to 6 a.m. Sunday. Several hundred people participated and 13 arrests were made.[261]

Pennsylvania

  • Allentown: A subdued rally occurred Saturday night at Seventh and Hamilton Streets. Mayor Ray O'Connel spoke to the crowd but was heckled for claiming "This is not my America!"[262][263]
  • Bethlehem: Hundreds of demonstrators demanded an end to police brutality at the Bethlehem Rose Garden followed by a march to City Hall on Saturday.[262]
  • Erie: Several hundred people chanted "No Justice! No Peace!" and carried signs reading "I Can't Breathe" in and around Perry Square on Saturday.[264]
  • Harrisburg: Protesters surrounded a police car after a peaceful rally that began at the State Capitol, riot police were summoned to shoot pepper spray into the crowd.[265][266]
  • Lancaster: Hundreds of protesters peacefully gathered at a rally named "We've had enough, time to stand" on Saturday morning.[267]
  • Philadelphia: Protesters demanded justice for a "Solidarity with Minneapolis" rally at City Hall and the iconic Philadelphia Museum of Art. At the height of the protests over 3,000 people were demonstrating.[268] The museum protests were peaceful, but in the evening the protests turned violent with police vehicles being set on fire and looting. The mayor imposed a city-wide 8pm curfew on Saturday night.[268]
  • Pittsburgh: The city was declared unsafe by city officials on Saturday after an initially peaceful downtown protest turned into a riot resulting in injuries, looting and burning of police cars.[269][270]
  • Scranton: Dozens of people peacefully protested at Courthouse Square on Saturday.[264]
  • Wilkes-Barre: Dozens of people held up signs and chanted "Black Lives Matter" at a center city public square on Saturday.[271]

Tennessee

Protests in front of the State Capitol in Nashville on May 30, 2020
  • Knoxville: Hundreds of protesters demonstrated on Friday evening in front of police headquarters and then marched through downtown Knoxville.[272]
  • Memphis: Silent demonstrations of around 40 people protesting the deaths of Floyd, Breonna Taylor in Kentucky, and Ahmaud Arbery, led to "verbal confrontations" with Memphis police and two counter-protesters from the Facebook group "Confederate 901".[273] On May 27, protesters shut down Union Avenue near McLean Boulevard.[274]
  • Nashville: A protest occurred Saturday afternoon in downtown Nashville; protesters peacefully demonstrated in Legislative Plaza and then marched to a police department.[275] In the evening, the crowd damaged a police car, threw rocks and sprayed graffiti; at least 5 were arrested.[276]

Texas

Protestors and police in Fort Worth, Texas

On May 30, Governor Greg Abbott deployed more than 1,500 police officers to Austin, Dallas, Houston and San Antonio.[277]

  • Austin: Protesters demonstrated in downtown Austin on Friday night; police arrested at least nine people.[278] On May 30 thousands of protesters gathered outside Austin Police Department’s headquarters. They then climbed on to I-35, stopping traffic on both sides.[279]
  • Dallas: Almost a thousand people protested in front of the Dallas Police Headquarters.[280] The gathering and march organized was by the Next Generation Action Network. On the night of May 29, some demonstrators broke windows, looted businesses, and damaged police cruisers in the Deep Ellum neighborhood and downtown Dallas. Mayor Eric Johnson said that while the protests were largely respectful, the looting and destruction of property could not be allowed.[281]
  • Houston: Large numbers protested in George Floyd's hometown. Mayor Sylvester Turner made calls for unity and peace.[282] Over 200 people were arrested, most with obstructing a roadway.[90] According to police reports four officers suffered minor injuries and eight police vehicles were damaged.[90] Houston police stated that they were investigating a video that appeared to show a female protester being trampled by a police officer on a horse.[283][284]
  • San Antonio: Several thousand people protested peacefully downtown outside the San Antonio Public Safety Headquarters.[285]

International

Protesters in Berlin, Germany

Controversies

Interactions with news reporters

A CNN black and latino reporter and his filming crew were arrested while giving a live television report on May 29 in Minneapolis by the Minnesota State Patrol, and then released about an hour later.[295] After the incident took place, Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz said that he deeply apologizes for what happened and would work to have the crew released, calling the event "unacceptable" and adding that there was "absolutely no reason something like this should happen".[295][296] CNN called the arrests a "clear violation of their First Amendment rights" in a tweet posted the same day.[296] After the incident the Minnesota State Patrol tweeted that "In the course of clearing the streets and restoring order at Lake Street and Snelling Avenue, four people were arrested by State Patrol troopers, including three members of a CNN crew. The three were released once they were confirmed to be members of the media,” however the CNN crew had already informed the troopers that they were members of the media before and during the arrest and carried the relevant paperwork and identification with them.[297][298] The Minneapolis Police Department falsely stated both whilst performing the arrest and via twitter that his crew had not adequately responded when asked what they were doing. [299]

Also on May 29 in Louisville, Kentucky, an officer fired pepper bullets at a reporter from WAVE who was reporting live on air for her station.[300]

On the evening of May 28, officers fired pepper bullets at several employees of The Denver Post who were reporting on protests in Denver, Colorado. A photographer was struck twice by pepper bullets, sustaining injuries on his arm. The photographer believed it was not accidental, saying, “If it was one shot, I can say it was an accident. I’m very sure it was the same guy twice. I’m very sure he pointed at me.” Another journalist claimed an officer shot at least one pepper bullet at her feet.[301]

Alleged extremist involvement

There have been accusations of various extremist groups using the cover of the protests to foment general unrest in the United States. Vice reported that the far-right "boogaloo boys", whose ideological aim is to incite a second civil war, have been spotted at the protests.[302] White supremacists were claimed by Minnesota officials to have taken part.[303] Donald Trump claimed "the radical left" and Antifa were behind the protests; however, he offered no evidence for this claim.[88]

The so-called "Umbrella Man", who was recorded calmly breaking windows during the beginning of the protests, was accused of being an agent provocateur, possibly working for the police.[51] Minnesota Governor Tim Walz speculated that there was "an organized attempt to destabilize civil society", with possibly as many as 80% of the individuals coming from outside the state.[304] The mayor of St. Paul, Melvin Carter, said that everyone arrested in St. Paul on May 29 was from out of state.[305]

Misinformation

Misinformation was spread across social media, hours prior to the beginning of the first protests. Members of the general public and celebrities have spread images of men wearing MAGA hats or near President Trump during a rally, that were falsely identified as Chauvin. Others have spread images of other protests or incidents claiming that the violence and destruction were attributed to the protestors but were instead from other protests.[306]

Reactions

Domestic

Political

Donald Trump official portrait (cropped 2).jpg
Donald J. Trump Twitter
@realDonaldTrump

....These THUGS are dishonoring the memory of George Floyd, and I won't let that happen. Just spoke to Governor Tim Walz and told him that the Military is with him all the way. Any difficulty and we will assume control but, when the looting starts, the shooting starts. Thank you!

May 29, 2020[307]

On May 27, 2020, President Donald Trump tweeted "At my request, the FBI and the Department of Justice are already well into an investigation as to the very sad and tragic death in Minnesota of George Floyd...."[308]

On May 29, Trump responded to the riots by threatening that either "the very weak Radical Left Mayor Jacob Frey get his act together and bring the City under control" or he will send in the National Guard, adding that "Any difficulty and we will assume control but, when the looting starts, the shooting starts."[309][310][311] The tweet was interpreted as quoting former Miami Police Chief Walter Headley, who said "when the looting starts, the shooting starts" in December 1967, as Miami saw escalating tensions and racial protests aimed at the 1968 Republican National Convention.[24][312] Trump's use of the quote was seen by Twitter as an incitement of violence; Twitter placed the tweet behind a public interest notice for breaching its terms of service in regards to incitement of violence.[313] The next day, Trump commented on his original tweet, saying, "Looting leads to shooting, and that's why a man was shot and killed in Minneapolis on Wednesday night - or look at what just happened in Louisville with 7 people shot. I don't want this to happen, and that's what the expression put out last night means...."[314]

On May 30, New York Governor Andrew Cuomo stated that the riots have exposed the "inequality and discrimination in the criminal justice system" and that "When you have one episode, two episodes maybe you can look at them as individual episodes. But when you have 10 episodes, 15 episodes, you are blind or in denial if you are still treating each one like a unique situation,".[315]

Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms called for protesters to express their anger through "non-violent" means. She decried the protests as illegitimate and accused them of harming Atlanta rather than helping.[316]

Iowa Governor Kim Reynolds and Des Moines Mayor Frank Cownie, while sympathizing with the anger of protesters, asked for citizens to stop the violence and have a "Respectful, peaceful dialogue".[317]

U.S. Attorney General William Barr blamed "anarchic and far left extremist groups using Antifa-like tactics" for the violence at the protests. "The voices of peaceful protest are being hijacked by violent radical elements," Barr said.[318]

Businesses and news reporting

An opinion piece in CNN argued that the protests and the general situation was worse than the riots that occurred following the assassination of Martin Luther King. Jr.[319]

A St. Paul firefighter stands outside of a still smoldering building on May 28

An article in Reason magazine said that police failed to protect local businesses from looters, arguing that police have failed at both of their essential functions: to protect persons and to protect property.[320]

On the morning of May 29, Target temporarily closed 24 of its locations in the Twin Cities area, and reopened all but six the same day.[321][322] Target later announced that they would be closing 73 of their Minnesota stores until further notice and made a commitment to rebuilding the store on Lake Street.[323]

Concerns over health

The Minnesota Department of Health raised concerns that the protests may exacerbate the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.[324] Philadelphia Mayor Jim Kenney requested that citizens protest according to social distancing guidelines.[325] Surgeon General Jerome Adams said, in relation to the protests, that the U.S. “must acknowledge & address the impact of racism on health".[2] He also tweeted:

We won’t fix or remove all the obstacles and stressors that are affecting people’s health and wellbeing — especially ones like racism — over night. That doesn’t mean we mustn't try at all.[2]

International

Nations

  •  Canada – Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau called for Canada to "stand together in solidarity" against racial discrimination. He said Canadians are watching the police violence in the United States in "shock and horror."[326]
  •  China – The Embassy of China in the United States issued an alert to Chinese citizens in the United States, saying "to closely monitor the local security situation, stay alert to police notices over demonstrations, protests and possible riots and avoid traveling to dangerous areas" and that "Chinese citizens operating stores and shops should remain vigilant and step up security measures".[327]
  •  Iran – Foreign Minister condemned what he called "the tragic murder of black people and deadly racial discrimination in the United States". It added that "the voices of the protesters must be heard ... (and) the repression of suffering Americans must be stopped immediately".[328]
  •  NorwayPrincess Märtha Louise of Norway called for the end of "the killing of innocent men and women" and for people to "wake up" and "[s]top this inhumanity".[329] She also shared a picture of a person holding a sign reading "George Floyd's life mattered".[c][329]
  •  Turkey – President Recep Tayyip Erdogan said a "racist and fascist" approach led to Floyd's death and said that "[we] will be monitoring the issue".[330]
  •  United Kingdom – The Foreign Office reacted to the arrest of a journalist and said that "journalists all around the world must be free to do their job and hold authorities to account without fear of retribution".[330]

Supranational bodies

  •  African Union – Head of the African Union Commission, Moussa Faki Mahamat, described Floyd's death as a "murder", stating that the African Union condemned the "continuing discriminatory practices against black citizens of the USA".[332]

See also

Further reading

Notes

  1. ^ The Bakersfield Californian reported that there were around 500 protesters, while the police estimated that between 200 and 300 protesters were in front of police headquarters.[165][166]
  2. ^ Source has the quote censored.
  3. ^ Sign was in all capital letters.[329]

References

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  2. ^ a b c Robertson, Nicky (May 30, 2020). "US surgeon general says "there is no easy prescription to heal our nation"". CNN. Retrieved May 30, 2020.
  3. ^ a b "Gov. Kemp to deploy up to 1,500 National Guardsmen in Atlanta Saturday night". WSB-TV. May 30, 2020. Retrieved May 30, 2020.
  4. ^ a b c Sands, Geneva (May 30, 2020). "Customs and Border Protection drone flew over Minneapolis to provide live video to law enforcement". CNN. Retrieved May 30, 2020.
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  10. ^ a b "atally struck by FedEx truck during George Floyd protests in St. Louis". NBC News.
  11. ^ #LIVE: Minneapolis Responds To Police Murder of George Floyd (Livestream). Unicorn Riot. May 28, 2020. See statement at 3:41:21.
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