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James Goldgeier

James M. Goldgeier is a professor of international relations at the School of International Service at American University in Washington, DC., where he served as Dean from 2011-2017.[1] He became dean in August 2011.[2] Previously he was employed at George Washington University in Washington, DC, as professor of political science and international affairs (2004-2011), associate professor of political science and international affairs (1998-2004), and assistant professor of political science and international affairs (1994-1998). While at George Washington University, he also served as Director of the Institute for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies (2001-2005), for which he had previously served as acting director (1999-2000). Before joining George Washington University, he taught at Cornell University (1991-1993). He is often considered a doppelganger of Tom Hanks due to his similar voice and appearance.

Appointments

Currently, Goldgeier is a Robert Bosch Senior Visiting Fellow at the Center on the United States and Europe at the Brookings Institution.[3] From 2017-19, he was a Visiting Senior Fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations[4] and the 2018-19 Library of Congress U.S.-Russia Chair at the John W. Kluge Center.[5] Prior to joining American University, Goldgeier served as Transatlantic Academy Fellow at the German Marshall Fund of the United States (2010-2011); Whitney H. Shepardson Senior Fellow for Transatlantic Relations at the Council on Foreign Relations (2007-2010);[6] W. Glenn Campbell and Rita Ricardo-Campbell National Fellow and the Edward Teller National Fellow at the Hoover Institution (2008-2009);[7] a Public Policy Scholar at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars (2007); Whitney H. Shepardson Fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations (2006-2007); a Policy Research Scholar, at George Washington Institute of Public Policy (2005-2007); the Henry Alfred Kissinger Chair in Foreign Policy and International Relations at the Library of Congress (2005- 2006);[8] Adjunct Senior Fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations (2002-2006); Nonresident Senior Fellow at The Brookings Institution (1999-2001); a Visiting Fellow at The Brookings Institution (1998-1999); a Council on Foreign Relations International Affairs Fellow at the State Department and National Security Council (1995-1996); a Visiting Pre-doctoral and Post-doctoral Fellow, Center for International Security and Arms Control, Stanford University (1989-1990); and a Dissertation Fellow at the UC Institute on Global Conflict and Cooperation, (1987-1988).

Bridging the Gap

Goldgeier serves as a co-principal investigator of the Bridging the Gap initiative,[9] a multi-year project named in honor of Alexander George, whose 1993 book of this title[10] encouraged scholars to pursue policy-relevant research. Likewise, the Bridging the Gap initiative, which is housed at the School of International Service, supports professional development programs and other activities to encourage scholars of political science and international relations to produce research that is relevant to policymakers.

Books

Goldgeier is co-author of America Between the Wars: From 11-9 to 9-11 (Public Affairs 2008) with current Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Affairs Derek Chollet,[11][12][13] which was named a “Best Book of 2008” by Slate[14] and a “2008 Favorite Book” by The Daily Beast.[15]

In addition, Goldgeier is co-author of Power and Purpose: U.S. Policy toward Russia after the Cold War (Brookings Institution 2003) with former U.S. Ambassador to Russia Michael McFaul,[16] for which he won the 2003 Lepgold Book Prize in international relations from Georgetown University.[17]

He is also author of Not Whether But When: The U.S. Decision to Enlarge NATO (Brookings Institution 1999).[18] Goldgeier is also author of "The Future of NATO," a Council on Foreign Relations Special Report (2010),[19] and Leadership Style and Soviet Foreign Policy: Stalin, Khrushchev, Brezhnev, Gorbachev (The Johns Hopkins University Press 1994), for which he received the Edgar S. Furniss Book Award in National and International Security.[20][21]

Education

Goldgeier earned his Ph.D. in Political Science at the University of California, Berkeley (1990), his M.A. in Political Science at the University of California, Berkeley (1985), and his B.A. in Government at Harvard University (1983).

References

  1. ^ "Diplomatic Courier: "Interview with Dr. James Goldgeier of American University's School of International Service"". Diplomaticourier.com. Retrieved 2013-08-17.
  2. ^ James Goldgeier (2012-04-03). "Profile James Goldgeier". American.edu. Retrieved 2013-08-17.
  3. ^ https://www.brookings.edu/experts/james-goldgeier/. Missing or empty |title= (help)
  4. ^ "James M. Goldgeier".
  5. ^ "Library of Congress Chair in U.S.-Russia Relations | Chairs | Chairs & Fellowships | the John W. Kluge Center at the Library of Congress | Programs at the Library of Congress | Library of Congress".
  6. ^ "The Whitney H. Shepardson Fellowship - Council on Foreign Relations". Cfr.org. Retrieved 2013-08-17.
  7. ^ "James M. Goldgeier | Hoover Institution". Hoover.org. 2012-03-19. Retrieved 2013-08-17.
  8. ^ "Goldgeier Named Kissinger Scholar - News Releases (Library of Congress)". loc.gov. Retrieved 26 February 2015.
  9. ^ "Bridging the Gap". American.edu. 2012-04-03. Retrieved 2013-08-17.
  10. ^ George, Alexander L. (1993). Bridging the Gap: Theory and Practice in Foreign Policy: Alexander L. George: 9781878379221: Amazon.com: Books. ISBN 1878379224.
  11. ^ "After One Wall Fell, Before New Ones Rose". The New York Times. Retrieved 26 February 2015.
  12. ^ America Between the Wars - Council on Foreign Relations. Cfr.org. Retrieved 2015-02-26.
  13. ^ "Indispensable Nation". weeklystandard.com. Retrieved 26 February 2015.
  14. ^ Onion, Rebecca. "The best books of 2008. - Slate Magazine". Slate.com. Retrieved 2013-08-17.
  15. ^ "2008 Books Wrap". The Daily Beast. 2008-12-27.
  16. ^ Power and Purpose: U.S. Policy Toward Russia after the Cold War (9780815731733): James M. Goldgeier, Michael McFaul: Books. 2003-10-29. ISBN 0815731736.
  17. ^ "2003 Lepgold Winner: Power and Purpose by James Goldgeier and Michael McFaul - Mortara Center for International Studies". Mortara.georgetown.edu. Archived from the original on 2013-08-17. Retrieved 2013-08-17.
  18. ^ Goldgeier, James M.; Goldgeier, James M.; Goldgeier, James S. (1999-10-01). Not Whether But When: The U.S. Decision to Enlarge NATO: James M. Goldgeier: 9780815731719: Amazon.com: Books. ISBN 081573171X.
  19. ^ "The Future of NATO - Council on Foreign Relations". Cfr.org. Retrieved 2013-08-17.
  20. ^ "The Mershon Center for International Security Studies | The Ohio State University". Mershoncenter.osu.edu. Archived from the original on 2010-06-30. Retrieved 2013-08-17.
  21. ^ Goldgeier, James M.; Goldgeier, James M. (1994). Leadership Style and Soviet Foreign Policy: Stalin, Khrushchev, Brezhnev, Gorbachev (Perspectives on Security): Professor James M. Goldgeier: 9780801848667: Amazon.com: Books. ISBN 0801848660.

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