wanweipedia

Krenak languages

Krenak
Aimoré
Botocudo
EthnicityAimoré
Geographic
distribution
Brazil
Linguistic classificationMacro-Jê
  • Krenak
Glottologaimo1246[1]
Krenák languages.png

The Aimoré or Botocudoan languages, now sometimes known as Krenakan after the last one remaining, are a branch of the Macro-Jê languages, including moribund Krenak and extinct languages such as Guerén and Nakrehé. Loukotka (1968) considered them dialects of a single language, but more recent treatments (Campbell 1997, Campbell & Grondona 2012) describe at least some of them as separate languages.

Languages

A fair amount of lexical data was collected before the majority of languages became extinct. Loukotka (1968) illustrates the following:

Krekmun/Kraik-mús, Krenak (Crenaque), Pejaurún (Cajaurun), Naknanuk (Nacnhanuc, Nakyananiuk), Xiporoc (Shiporoc, Yiporok, Djiporoca), Nak-Ñapma, Bakuen (Bacuen, Bocué), Nakrehé (Nacrehé), Aranãa, Miñan-yirugn, Pojichá (Pozyichá), Gueren

and mentions sources of data for:

Uti Krag (Guti Krag, Ngùd-Kràg),

reported in 1913 to still be spoken. Miñan-yirugn and some of the other might still have been spoken in Loukotka's time.

Other varieties sometimes reported in the literature, but of which nothing is known, include Ankwet (Anquet) and Xónvúgn (Chonvugn).

Footnotes

  1. ^ Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin, eds. (2017). "Aimore". Glottolog 3.0. Jena, Germany: Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History.

References

  • Alain Fabre, 2005, Diccionario etnolingüístico y guía bibliográfica de los pueblos indígenas sudamericanos: BOTOCUDO[1]



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