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List of earthquakes in Russia

The largest Russian earthquakes (≥ 8.0 M) since the 1950s.

Earthquakes in Russia have occasionally been damaging and deadly.

Map

Some of the largest Russian earthquakes since the latter half of the 20th century are the 1958/1963 and 2006/2007 earthquakes in the Kuril Islands near Japan, as well as the 1952/1959 earthquakes in the Kamchatka Peninsula, all of which were ≥ 8.0 M. See also the Kuril–Kamchatka Trench.

Earthquakes

Date Region Mag. MMI Deaths Injuries Total damage / notes
2013-05-24 Okhotsk Sea 8.3 Mw V Significant in seismology
2008-10-11 North Caucasus 5.8 Mw VIII 13 116
2008-08-27 Lake Baikal 6.3 Mw VIII Minor damage [1]
2007-08-02 Tatar Strait 6.2 Mw VIII 2 12 Tsunami [2]
2007-01-13 Kuril Islands 8.1 Mw VI Tsunami
2006-11-15 Kuril Islands 8.3 Mw IV 1 Tsunami
2006-04-21 Kamchatka 7.6 Mw X 40 $55 million
2003-09-27 Altai Republic 7.3 Mw X 3 5 $10.6–33 million
1997-12-05 Kamchatka 7.7 Mw VII
1995-05-27 Sakhalin 7.0 Ms IX 1989 750 $64.1–300 million
1994-10-04 Kuril Islands 8.3 Mw 12 1000+ Tsunami
1970-05-14 North Caucasus 6.7 Mw VII 101 [3]
1963-10-20 Kuril Islands 7.8 Mw Tsunami
1963-10-13 Kuril Islands 8.5 Mw IX Tsunami
1959-05-04 Kamchatka 8.0 Ms VIII 1 13 Tsunami
1958-11-06 Kuril Islands 8.3 Mw [4]
1952-11-05 Kamchatka 9.0 Mw XI 2,336
1946-11-02 Kyrgyzstan, Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan 7.6 Mw X Unknown Severe damage
1923-04-13 Kamchatka 6.8 Mw X 18 Tsunami [5][6]
1923-02-03 Kamchatka 8.4 Ms XI 3
1918-09-07 Kuril Islands 8.1 Mw 23 17 Tsunami [7]
1911-01-03 Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan 7.7 Mw X 452 Severe damage
1907-10-21 Uzbekistan, Tajikistan 7.4 Ms IX 12,000–15,000
Note: The inclusion criteria for adding events are based on WikiProject Earthquakes' notability guideline that was developed for stand alone articles. The principles described also apply to lists. In summary, only damaging, injurious, or deadly events should be recorded.

See also

References

  1. ^ USGS. "M 6.3 - Lake Baykal region, Russia". United States Geological Survey.
  2. ^ USGS. "M 6.2 - Tatar Strait, Russia". United States Geological Survey.
  3. ^ "M 6.7 - Caucasus region, Russia". United States Geological Survey. Retrieved July 3, 2019.
  4. ^ "M 8.3 - Kuril Islands". United States Geological Survey. Retrieved March 12, 2018.
  5. ^ "M 6.8 - near the east coast of the Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia". United States Geological Survey. Retrieved July 3, 2019.
  6. ^ "Tsunami Event: KAMCHATKA". National Geophysical Data Center. Retrieved July 3, 2019.
  7. ^ "M 8.1 - Kuril Islands". United States Geological Survey. Retrieved July 3, 2019.

This page was last updated at 2021-01-29 01:30, update this pageView original page

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